The Classroom Bookshelf
Inside The Classroom Bookshelf
Mary Ann Cappiello

About Mary Ann Cappiello

Mary Ann is a professor of language and literacy at Lesley University. A former public school language arts and humanities teacher, she is a passionate advocate for and commentator on children’s books. Mary Ann is the co-author of Teaching with Text Sets and Teaching to Complexity.

Shedding Light on 20th Century Termination and Relocation Efforts with Indian No More

Ideal for explorations of family, friendship, and identity, the impact of federal policies generationally on Native Americans, and the process by which we claim our own identities, Indian No More will linger in the hearts and minds of readers.

Exploring Race, Class, and School Integration with The Long Ride

For independent and curricular explorations, The Long Ride offers readers a snapshot of a girl, a city, and a country trying to forge a new identity and a foundation for the future.

Celebrating Grandparents and Elders

Preschool and primary grade readers will find comfort in the closeness and warmth shared between grandparents and grandchildren as they go about their everyday rituals and routines.

Saying Goodbye to 2019 with the Best in Children’s Books

We hope you find this curated “best of” list useful for your winter holiday reading and gift-giving, your classroom planning, and/or your library purchases.

Fostering a Sense of Gratitude Year-Round with Thanku

Beyond a focus on giving thanks in November, Thanku can be used across the school year for read alouds at the beginning and end of the day, poetry genre studies, as an exploration of theme across language arts, and as a window into small moments in writer’s workshop.

Wonder, Words, and Wisdom: Teaching with the Works of Kwame Alexander

It is the power of the poem that we turn our attention to this week. In particular, we highlight Kwame Alexander’s powerful and prodigious body of work.

Need a Brush Up on the Constitution?

Current events this week may leave you and your middle grade students with more Constitutional questions than answers. Perhaps our entry on teaching with the 2018 Orbis Pictus Honor Book Fault Lines in the Constitution: The Framers, Their Fights, and the Flaws That Affect Us Today can help!

Rethinking U.S. History through an Indigenous Lens

A necessary read for teachers and students alike in middle and high schools across the country, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States is an important step in transforming curriculum and student understanding of the Indigenous knowledge, activism, and agency that have existed, often unrecognized, throughout American history.

Exploring History, Commemorating PRIDE with Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution.

As the first picture book on Stonewall, timed for the 50th anniversary, Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution provides teachers, librarians, parents, and children with an entry point into the history of the Gay Rights Movement, to be explored in the context of other books, those written and yet-to-be-written, and digital texts as well.

Exploring Adaptations and Design with Seashells: More Than a Home

Ideal for explorations in science, language arts, and social studies, for whole class and small group explorations, and for quiet rereadings by shell-lovers and beachcombers, Seashells: More than a Home has many roles to play in the classroom and beyond.