The Classroom Bookshelf
Inside The Classroom Bookshelf
Mary Ann Cappiello

About Mary Ann Cappiello

Mary Ann is a professor of language and literacy at Lesley University. A former public school language arts and humanities teacher, she is a passionate advocate for and commentator on children’s books. Mary Ann is the co-author of Teaching with Text Sets and Teaching to Complexity.

Wonder, Words, and Wisdom: Teaching with the Works of Kwame Alexander

It is the power of the poem that we turn our attention to this week. In particular, we highlight Kwame Alexander’s powerful and prodigious body of work.

Need a Brush Up on the Constitution?

Current events this week may leave you and your middle grade students with more Constitutional questions than answers. Perhaps our entry on teaching with the 2018 Orbis Pictus Honor Book Fault Lines in the Constitution: The Framers, Their Fights, and the Flaws That Affect Us Today can help!

Rethinking U.S. History through an Indigenous Lens

A necessary read for teachers and students alike in middle and high schools across the country, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States is an important step in transforming curriculum and student understanding of the Indigenous knowledge, activism, and agency that have existed, often unrecognized, throughout American history.

Exploring History, Commemorating PRIDE with Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution.

As the first picture book on Stonewall, timed for the 50th anniversary, Stonewall: A Building. An Uprising. A Revolution provides teachers, librarians, parents, and children with an entry point into the history of the Gay Rights Movement, to be explored in the context of other books, those written and yet-to-be-written, and digital texts as well.

Exploring Adaptations and Design with Seashells: More Than a Home

Ideal for explorations in science, language arts, and social studies, for whole class and small group explorations, and for quiet rereadings by shell-lovers and beachcombers, Seashells: More than a Home has many roles to play in the classroom and beyond.

Exploring Poetry, Language, and Adaptation with Superlative Birds

For bird lovers, word lovers, and poetry lovers alike, Bulion’s latest collection is ideal for classroom explorations of language and grammar, poetry, and the world of birds and their many adaptations, preparing you for April’s bird migrations and celebration of poetry.  

Exploring Women’s History and Gender Perspectives through Voices: The Final Hours of Joan of Arc

Ideal for verse novel genre study, an exploration of the power of poetry, historical fiction genre study, an examination of the lives of women in medieval Europe, and more, Voices has much to offer mature tween and teen readers and their teachers.

Exploring Power, Agency, and the Black Freedom Movement with Never Caught

Never Caught, the Young Reader’s Edition of Erica Armstrong Dunbar’s 2017 National Book Award Finalist, explores the intricate and intimate ways in which the personal lives of George and Martha Washington and the enslaved men and women they owned were tangled together. As Martha Washington’s personal maid, Ona Judge, a skillful seamstress, had access to fine clothes, trips to the theater, and the chance to travel beyond Mt. Vernon. But for Judge, that was not enough. Only freedom was enough. Ideal for biography genre study as well as explorations of the Black Freedom Movement and the American Revolution, Never Caught can play many roles in middle grade language arts and social studies classrooms.

The Power of Apology: Teaching with Orbis Pictus Honor Book Thirty Minutes Over Oregon

This book is a welcome invitation to all of us to model civility and forgiveness in our communities, without waiting for our elected officials.

Curated Best Children’s Book Lists of 2018!

Looking for books for the children, teachers, or librarians in your life? Use these year-end “best of” lists to guide your selections!