The Classroom Bookshelf
Inside The Classroom Bookshelf

Fry Bread, A Native American Family Story: A Love Letter to Indigenous Nations and Communities

Winner of the 2020 Robert F. Sibert Medal for most distinguished information book for children and an American Indian Youth Literature Honor recipient, Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story is a love letter to Indigenous nations and communities centered around a simple food that represents a complex history of survival, relocation, and resilience.

Welcome Winter with Wait, Rest, Pause

How do animals and plants survive weather extremes like cold, heat, and drought? The concept of dormancy and variations of this biological process, which include diapause, hibernation, torpor, brumation, and estivation, are the subject of an engaging work of expository nonfiction by Marcie Flinchum Atkins. Employing a patterned text, figurative language, and series of lively verbs, Flinchum compares and contrasts different forms of dormancy in mammals, birds, insects, reptiles, and even in plants.

Follow Human Impact to Hope in Moth: An Evolution Story

Discover a creative nonfiction tale that explores the notions of contrast, evolution, and perseverance within the natural world–all through the unlikely hero of the moth.

Just Right: Searching for the Goldilocks Planet

“When you look toward the stars, do you wonder if anyone is looking back? Is Earth the only planet with intelligent life? Is it the only planet with life at all?” Curtis Manley’s new nonfiction picturebook, Just Right: Searching for the Goldilocks Planet, tackles these complex wonderings with aplomb through the existence of exoplanets—that is, extrasolar planets that orbit the countless stars across the universe.

Learn and Grow with Seeds Move! by Robin Page

Seed dispersal is the topic of collage artist Robin Page’s latest nonfiction picture book. Versatile for use throughout the seasons, this teaching tool plants the seeds for important classroom conversations about nature, interdependence, and the importance of conservation.

Fast Enough: Bessie Stringfield’s First Ride

“Have you ever been told you are not enough?” With this opening line, author-cartoonist Joel Christian Gill grabs the attention of readers of all ages and introduces us to the legendary Bessie Stringfield, the first African American woman to ride solo across the United States on a motorcycle.

Constructing Curriculum: Teaching with Jorey Hurley’s Skyscraper

The processes and machines used to build a skyscraper are the subject of Jorey Hurley’s latest picture book offering. Construction vehicles take center stage in the digitally rendered illustrations. Hurley’s bright colors and geometrical shapes detail fourteen different machines and their roles in building a glass encased skyscraper. This engaging title is sure to inspire young readers to want to know more about cities and their skylines.

The Power of Apology: Teaching with Orbis Pictus Honor Book Thirty Minutes Over Oregon

This book is a welcome invitation to all of us to model civility and forgiveness in our communities, without waiting for our elected officials.

Rodent Rascals: From Tiny to Tremendous – 21 Creatures at Their Actual Size

A superhero rat who can scale buildings and chew through cement; a capybara as a seeing-eye guide animal; rats trained to detect landmines and Tuberculosis – these fascinating rodents and 18 more are the subject of author/illustrator Roxie Munro’s latest picture book.

Nothing Stopped Sophie and Counting on Katherine

Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain Written by Cheryl Bardoe; Illustrated by Barbara McClintock Published by Little, Brown Young Readers, 2018 ISBN #978-0-316-27820-1   Grades K and up   As a young girl, Sophie Germain could not get enough of numbers: “she cherished how math could make sense of the world.” […]